Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW or FCA) is a semi-automatic or automatic arc welding process. FCAW requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux and a constant-voltage or, less commonly, a constant-current welding power supply. An externally supplied shielding gas is sometimes used, but often the flux itself is relied upon to generate the necessary protection from the atmosphere, producing both gaseous protection and liquid slag protecting the weld. The process is widely used in construction because of its high welding speed and portability.

FCAW was first developed in the early 1950s as an alternative to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The advantage of FCAW over SMAW is that the use of the stick electrodes used in SMAW is unnecessary. This helped FCAW to overcome many of the restrictions associated with SMAW.

TOKO AWS A5.20 E71T-1C is a most popular flux cored wire designed for single or multi pass welding having a smooth arc transfer, low spatter, flat to slightly convex bead contour, with a high deposition rate and easily removal slag. This all-position wire has excellent feeding and low fume generation using 100% CO2 making it a good choice for mild steel and higher strengths steels. Argon - CO2 gases may be used if tested with application.